The Times of Rikyu

Salons and Douboushu
by YAMAMOTO Kenichi (Sept. 2011)

Whenever anyone mentions the role of the douboushu, the common assumption is that surely Rikyu Koji never needed the frienship of anyone like that. Actually, weren’t they more likely at loggerheads with each other?: people can’t help but think that. If you look at it from Rikyu’s position, douboushu were clinging to faction maintaining the rules for an outdated aesthetic. If you look at it from the douboushu’s position, Rikyu Koji was the leader of a reforming influence that violently cast away the rules. Either was you look at it, it unmistakably seems to be an relationship that is painful to witness.

It seems douboushu were originally buddhist monks who served the the shoguns of the House of Ashikaga.It is thought that becase many of them took the name of Amitabha. Always by the side of the shogun, during war, they held funerals for the fallen and took charge of entainments on the battlefeild. In times of peace at the mansions, from cleaning responsibilities, they took charge of various responsiblities such as the lord’s messagers, delivering gifts, decorating the rooms, and chanoyu.

Japan had a salon culture. People gathered in the hiroma of the mansion of nobles and discussed philosphy and arts, amusing themselves by enjoying the passing seasons. That was salon culture. From the start in Europe, but also in China and Asia, there was this culture from old. In Japan, the greatly different circumstances gave birth to special rules on how to arrange the salon, called “shitsurae”. The word shitsurae, ab initio derived from “shitsu-rei (lit. Room Ettiquette)”, something I am ashamed to say I didn’t know until researching douboushu. The douboushu, especially, created these rules of shitsurae and passed them down as secrets. The salons of Japan were called “kaisho (lit. Meeting-Place)”. This was their designation from the first part of the Kamkura period. The Heian nobles lived in Shinden style mansions, but the Kamakura samurai prefered simpler buildings. At this time, a place were people gathered was the kaisho. Even glancing at architectural history, it seems altogether unlikely that this was a special type building. In Muromachi times, buildings called kaisho were made for the House of Kamakura shoguns. As buildings 6 ken long and 7 ken wide became standard, they were divided into the southern front used as public formal space and the nothern interior used as a private personal space. The lord’s private rooms in the interior had a back door. This was included within the 6 by 7 ken buildings. So we can’t say it was likely very expansive. The raised floor looking out over the wide southern lanai was a place for the lord’s public life. Next to that, the wide room continued. Guests were brought there for an audience with the lord. This kaisho architecture was not just for the Shogun’s house, but spread to the warrior class, noble class, and also temples and shrines. The people gathered there amused themselves with renka poetry, tea competitions, Genji incense, and sarugaku theatre. They also had flower and moon veiwing banquets. Without a doubt, they enjoyed various events with the passing of the seasons. To researchers, this may seem like an exceedingly ordinary thing, but if you consider Muromachi times when chanoyu was coming into existance, the concept of “za (seat)” was fundamental. This is the “za” of “ichi-za kon-ryuu” (building up the seat). The people gathered at the kaisho wracked thier brains to build up the seating. However could they enliven–however could they enjoy–that day’s gathering? However could they capture the feel of the season? However could they be calmed by this circle of people? The man behind all this who put forth the all the energy was the douboushu.

利休の風景
会所と同朋衆
作家山本謙一(やまもとけんいち)

同朋衆という人々を思い浮かべるたびに、利休居士とは、さぞや仲が要かったにちがいない、と想像をめぐらせてしまう。
じつは、ほとんど犬猿の仲だたのではないか―そんな風に思えてならない。
居士の目から見れば、同朋衆は古くさい美学をルールにしがみついた旧守派である。
同朋衆たちの目から見れば、利休居士はルールを破り捨てた革新勢力の旗頭である。
どちらにとっても、目障りな存在だったにちがいなかろう。
同朋衆は、もともと足利将軍家に仕える時宗の僧侶であったらしい。阿弥号を称する者が多いところから、そう考えられている。
いつも将軍のそばにいて、合戦のときは死者を弔い、戦陣での芸能ごとも受け持った。
平時の居館では、掃除から、主人の使いや贈答品の取次ぎ、座敷の飾り付けや茶の湯など、さまざまな用をこなした。

日本には、サロンの文化があった。
人々が貴人の屋敷の広間に集い、芸術や哲学を論じ、四季折々の楽しみに興じるのが、サロン文化である。
ヨーロッパをはじめ、中国、アジアにもこういう文化は古くからあっただろう。
日本で、事情が大きく異なっているのは、サロンを飾り付ける「しつらえ」に、特別なルールが生まれたことだ。
しつらえ―という言葉が、そもそも〝室礼〟から派生したのだということを、同朋衆について調べるまで、恥ずかしながらわたしは知らなかった。
同朋衆こそが、しつらえのルールを生み出し、それを秘伝として伝えていたのである。
日本のサロンは、会所と呼ばれた。
鎌倉時代初期からの呼び名だという。
平安貴族たちは、寝殿造りに住んだが、鎌倉武士たちは質朴な館を好んだ。
そのころは、人の集まる場所が会所であった。建築史を繙(ひもと)いて調べても、特別な館があったわけではなさそうだ。
室町期になって、会所と称する館が足利将軍家にできた。
梁行六間、桁行七間が基本となる建築で、公的なハレの場である南側の表と、私的なケの場である北側の奥が分かれていた。
主人の私的な空間である奥には、納戸もあった。それまで含めて六間と七間の建物である。さして広いとはいえまい。
南側の広縁に面した上段の間が、主人の公的な居場所である。そのとなりに広間がつづいている。来客はそこに通され、主人に拝謁する。
この会所建築は、将軍家ばかりでなく、武家、公家、寺社などにも広まった。
そこに集まった人々は、連歌や闘茶、源氏香、あるいは猿楽などに興じた。花見や月見の宴もあったであろう。四季折々、さまざまな催しを楽しんだに違いない。
研究者の方にはきわめて常識的なことであろうが、室町期に成立した茶の湯を考えるにあたっては、「座」の概念が欠かせない。
一座建立―というときの「座」である。
会所に集まる人たちは、一座の建立にこころをくだいた。
その日の集まりを、いかに盛り上げ、いかに楽しむか。季節の風物をいかに取り込み、人の輪をいかになごまぜるか―。
裏方として精を出していたのが、同朋衆であった。

Advertisements