Random stolen picture of dew

A selection from a tea blog called Ichi Yori Narai.

In the tea room, dew is an accessory. I’ve learned that we give the unique natural flower opf a tea party a vibrant feeling beyond all others by misting it with a dew using an atomizer or chasen. For this tea aesthetic that loathes dryness, we can do this for the kaiseki dishes too. Especially on a hot summer day, we can most certainly slightly sprinkle water with a chasen on bowls and trays: Sprinkling the dew.

Anyway, the word “dew” (tsuyu) also appears as the name of of various chadogu parts:

  • The tip of the chashaku’s head
  • The threads of the tassels of the dangling futai (generally the white ones are called “dew” and the coloured ones are called “flower”)
  • The tip of where the nadare glaze has dripped down on a chaire or other dogu
  • The part of the seam on a shifuku where the left and right sides come sewn together

These are all called “dew”. Presumably the image of water dripping down is outstanding. This is such a great way of expressing things that I feel a sense of respect for the stylish sense those who travelled this path before me.

茶席には「露」が付物である。席中の唯一の自然である花は、みずみずしさをより感じさせるように霧吹きや茶筅で露を見せるのがならいとされている。乾ききったものをきらう茶趣は懐石でもそうで、とくに暑い夏はかならず椀や折敷に茶筅に水を含ませて軽く振りかけ、露を打つ。

さて、「露」という言葉は、他に茶道具の各部名称にも登場する。
・茶杓の櫂先の最先端。
・掛け物の上部から下がっている垂風帯の小さな房状の糸(ほとんどは白色なので「露」というが、色物は「花」と呼ぶそうである)。
・茶入などの釉薬のなだれ落ちた先端の釉溜まり。
・仕覆の左右の布を縫い合わせた綴じ目の部分。

これら全部を「露」と称している。水のしたたりの景色に見立てたのだろう。うまく言い表すものだ、と、この道の先人のセンスに敬意を感じる。

Advertisements