Detail of Img 25

The Yankee-suwari of Samurai
When I was searching through photographs from late Edo Japan, I had a rather large shock when I found image 25. The scene is at the entrance of a samurai family’s mansion. The scene is of a self-important looking warrior traveling to a castle in an extravagent palaquin decorated with black and gold lacquer.Those surrounding the palaquin wait upon the lord’s presence with lowered heads. What is that seated position called? All of the retainer-like warriors are in a position similar to “yankee-suwari”: this can’t just be my imagination. And not just this single picture either. I searched for other examples of the same thing, and there were! (Img. 26)

Img 26

A swarthy faced man is sitting on a stump wearing a crested haori coat. He holds an upright fan at his left knee and a book in his right hand. And indeed, he is looking self-important. Squatting down with both knees up is a person who appears to be like a townsman with his head lowered. This is the position called “yankee-suwari”.
I don’t think there are many people who feel this position similar to “groveling (hai-tsukubaru)” on the ground is artistically beautiful. Incidentally, the modern position of “seiza” was formally called “tsukubau”. About this, let me point out that the stance of seiza includes the implication of “groveling” or “submitting” by those inferior to oneself.
In image 25 which shows the same crouching position. While the warrior wearing a haori with his upper body erect isn’t very yankee-ish, the attendants without hakama who are leaning their chest against their thighs are most certainly doing what we now call “yankee-suwari”. Guessing from their dress, it seems possible they are townspeople employed as attendents by retainers not financially well off. This isn’t an established style of sitting, but has an air of nobody caring really how the feet are as long as the head isn’t held high.
To make this comparision is bad, but the posture of samurai waiting thier turn when attending at the imperial court is stylish and good-looking.
Image 27, from “Kasuga Gongen Genki-e”, is a scene at Fujiwara no Norimichi’s mansion. Among the retainers in front of the ox cart which Norimichi rides to serve at the imperial palace are four warriors sitting near the ox cart, with lacquered bows in their right hands. They readied in a position called “kata-shouza”, with their left knee standing up in contrast with their right knee spread open wide. Most likely skilled archers I suppose. The four men aligned and standing ready in tate-hiza like this has a majestic and magnificent feeling indeed. This position seems to endow those serving at the imperial court, no matter what duties they have, with an appropriate dignity.
It isn’t the signature phrase of the drama “Mito Komon”, but if an official said “You head is too high! Wait your turn!”, at once people lowered only their heads and took the position of “tsukubau” before them. If we assume this spread within warrior-class society, this way of sitting, which is used unchanged in any way by these commoners gambling at the crossroads (Img 28), was probably estalished. Even if that is so, when we look at the submissive flavour of this position (Img 25, 26), we can imagine how popular the low class samurai were of which old school rakugo often made fun.
武士のヤンキー坐り
幕末の日本を撮影した写真を調べていたときに、図25の映像を見つけた衝撃はたいそう大きなものdった。武家屋敷の玄関の前。黒漆に蒔絵を施した豪奢な駕籠で自分の高そうな武士が登城するという場面である。駕籠を取り囲む者たちは頭を低くして殿の御前に控えている。その坐り方は何ということか。家臣らしき武士までが「ヤンキー坐り」をしていたなどとは、まさk想像だにしなかった。それもこの一枚だけではない。他にも同じような事例がないかと探してみると、ある!(図26)切り株に腰掛けた浅黒い顔の男は紋付きを羽織、左膝の上に扇子を立てて右手に書物らしきものをもっている。いかにも偉そうにとしているが、頭を低くしている町人風の身なりの者は両立て膝でしゃがみ込む、いわゆれ「ヤンキー坐り」の恰好だ。
地面に「這い蹲る」ようなこの恰好を絵的に美しいと感じる人はあまりいないとは思うが、当時この坐り方は「つくばう」と呼ばれていたものと思われる。ちなみに現代の「正座」の恰好にも、かつては「つくばう」という呼び名あった。このことは、立場が劣る者が「這い蹲る」「屈服する」という意味合いが正坐という姿勢のなかに含まれていることを示している。
図25では、同じようなしゃがみ込む恰好でも、羽織袴の武士は少し上体が起き上がっていて、それほどヤンキーっぽくはないが、袴を着けていない従者たちは太腿に胸を預けて、いまで言う「ヤンキー坐り」そのものだ。出で立ちから想像すると、財政に余裕のない家臣たちが外回りの雑事のために町人を雇っていたのかも知れない。その坐り方には、決まったスタイルがあるわけでなく、とりあえず頭さえ高くなければ、足の処し方はうるさく言わない、といった風である。
比べては悪いが、宮廷に仕える侍たちは控えのときの身構えにもスタイルがあって恰好が良い。
図27は『春日権現験記絵』より、藤原教通邸での場面。内裏に出仕する教通を乗せた牛車の前にいる家臣たちのうち、牛車近くに坐っている四人の武士は、膝塗りの弓を右手に、左膝を立てて対する右膝を大きく開いた「片踵坐」に構えている。おそらく弓術の手練なのだろう。大の男が四人揃ってこのような立て膝に構えていると、いかにも壮麗で、威厳が感じられる。宮廷に仕える人々の佇まいには、その使命に相応しい尊厳が、どの役目の者にも備わっているように見える。
ドラマ「水戸黄門」の決め台詞ではないが、「頭が高い!控えおれ!」と言われたら、とりあえず頭だけは低くして御上に「つくばう」姿勢をとることが、武家社会のなかで普及していたのだとしたら、その坐り方は辻で博奕を打つ庶民の男たち(図28)と何ら変わらない形が定着していたということだろうか。それにしてもこの坐り方(図25、図26)の屈服加減を見ていると、古典落語などでよく揶揄されて下級武士の人望のほどが想像できるようだ。

Advertisements