For the Sake of More Freely Moving
Trying out Kimono ①
by MISAGO Chidzuru, Professor at Tsuda College

Kimono are hard to move in, stiff, and you can’t move quickly in them. Movement is hindered by the bound obi, one can’t walk quickly, and one can’t move vigorously. Currently, everybody has this image about kimono.
I often hear it said: the pace of today’s lifestyle is fast. Back in the day it was calmer. Is that really so? The speed of communication and traffic has increased, but hasn’t the amount we move our bodies decreased? Formerly, the Japanese moved really fast. Not just the way in which they moved. They used their bodies. They used them extremely fast.
After making breakfast for the family, while it was still dark, I left the house and climbed up to the shrine on top of the mountain to pray for my sick father. I did this every morning. I don’t think the distance was less than 10 kilometers. I left the house for school at 4:30 in the morning, walking 15 kilometers. When going down the mountain, I went through the trees, because it was faster than the road. I sound completely like an old mountain sage, but I say it so people can understand what I am talking about. Mr. TAKAOKA Hideo, a scholar of Physical Education, said that samurai would fight with rude people like those who wave around their swords. Realising their opponent was about to draw, they would draw at the same time. Really, earth-shatteringly fast. That is how quickly the Japanese of old moved.
We are animals. We are animals because we move. We are comfortable because we move. The Japanese are known for being good at walking fast. The way the Japanese walk is fast. The kimono is such a people’s traditional clothing. For that reason, it seems unlikely that it is by nature hard to move in. It is most likely a very practical garment. If it were hard to move in, history would have weeded it out long ago.
It has been 9 years since I started wearing kimono almost everyday as casual, everday clothing. Compared to people of old, that is yet a pretty short career. However, dressing like this, I have come to understand how it feels for the body to live wearing kimono. I no longer think that kimono is hard to move in.
All traditions are originally born from convenience and a way to beautifully live life. I want to recover the quick movement of wearing kimono. So we can more freely move in kimono.

より自由になるために
きものを着てみると①
津田塾大学教授・作家三砂ちづる

きものは動きにくい、きゅうくつ、素早く動けない。帯を締めると動きが妨げられる、速く歩くこともできないし、活発な動きはできない。今、誰もがきものに対してそういうイメージを持っている。
今の生活のテンポは速い、昔はゆったりとしていた、という言い方もよく聞く。本当にそうだろうか。通信、交通は速度を増したが、私たちの体御使っての移動は、逆に遅くなっているのではないか。一昔前の日本人は、移動速度が大変速かったという。移動手段を使っていたわけではない。体を使っていた。それが非常に速かったのだ。
病気の夫の願掛けをするために、家族の朝ご飯を作ったら、まだ暗いうちに家を出て山をひと上がりして、山の上の神社に参る。それを毎朝やる。10キロなどという距離ではなかったかもしれない。学校に通うために朝4時半に家を出て、15キロを下がる。山を下がって行くには、道を行くより速いから、木を伝ったりする。まるで仙人の話のようだが、そういうことが今聞き取り可能な方から聞こえてくる。運動科学者の高岡英夫氏は、侍は、刀がふれて無礼者、と切りあった、などといわれているが、彼らは刀がふれたと気づいたときにはお互いもう、ものすごく遠くにいっていたはずだ、そのくらい素早く動いてはずだ、という。
我々は動物である。動いているから動物だ。動いているから快適だ。日本人はとりわけ、「速く」歩くことを得意としていたようだ。和の歩き方は速い。きものはそのような私たちの伝統衣装であった。だから、元々動きにくいものであったはずではない。合理的なものであったはずで、動きにくければ、すでに歴史の上で淘汰されていたはずだ。
普段着、日常着として、ほぼ毎日きものを着始めて9年目になる。昔の人と比べたらまだまだキャリアは短い。しかしこのようにして着ていると、昔の人がきものを着てどのように暮らしていたか、が体で感じられるようになってくる。きものが動きにくい、とは思えなくなる。
いかなる伝統も、元々は生活の美しい所作と利便性から生まれる。きものを着ての、機敏な動きをとりもどしたいと思う。きものを着てより自由になるために。

Advertisements