Well, how does China relate to the foundations of Japanese culture? Let’s look at the following description in the Ming period “Journey to the West” by Wu Cheng-en.

猿王也是他一竅通時百竅通、当時習了口訣、自習自練、将七十二般変化、都学成了。

To explain, it says that when the Monkey King (Sun Wukong) passed through one hole, he could pass through 100, ie. all, holes. Immediately, he learned the details and gist of things. Furthermore, he finished learning all of the 72 types of transformations through personally practicing.
The phrase “Ittsuu, hyakutsu” (When passing through one, you pass through all) often used in modern China comes from this. It has the same meaning as the previously explained phrase “Those who excell in an art(gei) are well-informed in everything.”
As explained above, Gei as used in these two proverbs has the former worldly meaning of “a means of livelihood” and the latter highly spiritual meaning of “a way to truth.” However, isn’t the source of “Art (gei) helps oneself” the same gei as in “the way to truth”? Hasn’t the interpretation expanded with time to include the worldly meaning of “a means of livelihood”? So it is thought.
In this way, by considering the meaning of gei in these ordinarily and innocently used proverbs, our image of the word gei changes. We discover that it’s source actually includes a rich meaning.

The Source of the Theory of Art
Well, reflecting on the origin of the meaning of gei, we can see as expected that it’s source comes from Chinese theory. I will explain more fully in February’s edition, but the following is about “Rites (Rei)” and “Music (Raku)” of the Six Arts (Rikugei), from the Chinese classic “Records of the Grand Historian.”

禮樂順天地之誠、達神明之徳

Here, the arts of rites and music are principles of Heaven and Earth, that is, of Nature and the Universe. Mastering the practice of Rites and Music is to acquire virture as if a kami, it is written.
Also, the next about virtue is from the Chapter Four: Li Ren of the Analects (#25).

子曰、徳不孤、必有鄰

In short, Confucius says that no matter what the circumstance may be, men who posses virtue are not left helpless. There will also be people who come and gather that love virtue. Those sympathetic and cooperative will always appear before virtous people. It explains the benefits of the virtue of the gods of Heaven and Earth.
Like this, the meaning of the origin of “gei” is the mastering the mysteries of an art: in buddhism it is enlightenment (satori), in confucianism it is acquiring “the virtue of the gods of Heaven and Earth.” This is by no means a matter of competing in skillfulness or the progress of one’s technique. It is said the mark of attainment is truely within your own self: deepening virtue for the sake of examining your own self. In other words, it is investigating the matter of yourself.
In next months February edition, I want to consider seeking the the origin within the Six Arts of educational curriculum of Chinese Zhou Dynasty.

では次に、日本文化の源泉ともいえる中国ではどうだろうか。明の呉承恩の『西遊記』には次のような記述がみられる。

猿王也是他一竅通時百竅通、当時習了口訣、自習自練、将七十二般変化、都学成了

解説すれば、猿王(孫悟空)は、一つの穴に通じれば百(すべて)の穴に通じることができ、即座に事物の内容や要点を習得し、さらに自ら修練して七十二種類の変化、すべてを学び終えたと述べている。
現代の中国で「一通百通」(一つに通すればすべてに通ずる)としてよく使われる格言の出典といわれている。この格言は先述した「一藝に秀でたる者はすべてに通ずる」と同義である。
以上述べたように二つの格言で用いられる「藝」は、前者は世俗的な「生計をたてる糧」を意味し、後者は「真理への道筋」として高精神性を意味している。しかし、「藝は身を助ける」も本来は、「真理への道筋」のための藝と同じであったのではないだろうか。時代とともに「生計をたてる糧」といった世俗的な意味合いに拡大解釈されたのではないかと考えられる。
このように、普段何気なく使っていることわざにある、藝の意味を考えることにより、我々がその言葉によっていだくイメージとは違ってその本来の在り方においては実に豊かな意味が含まれていることが解る。

「藝」の思想の源泉
さて、藝の本来の意味を省みてみると、やはり中国思想にその源泉を見出すことができる。二月号で詳しく述べることになるが、中国の古典『史記』、六藝の中の「禮」と「樂」について次のようにある。

禮樂順天地之誠、達神明之徳

ここでは、藝としての「禮」と「樂」は天地すなわち自然や宇宙(うちゅう)の理そのものであり、「禮」と「樂」を実践し極めることは、神のような徳を得ることである、とある。
また、『論語』「里仁第四」には、徳について次のようにある。

子曰、徳不孤、必有鄰

つまり、孔子は徳を備えた人格者はどんな場合にも孤立することはない。必ずその徳を慕って集まってくる人がいて、徳ある人には必ず理解者や協力者が現れるという、天地神明の徳の効用を述べている。
このように「藝」の本来の意味とは、その藝の奥義を極めることによって、仏教では「悟り」、儒教では「天地神明の徳」を得ることであることであるとしている。それは決して技の上達やスキルを競うものでもない。その到達点はまさに自分自身の中にあり、徳を深め、自己を追究するためのものであるといえよう。すなわち、己事究明なのである。
来月の二月号では、中国・周代の教育科目であった「六藝」にその淵源を求めて考えてみたい。

Advertisements