This is part one of an article from Tanko Magazine November 2011.

The World of Rikyu
Sengoku Bubble
by YAMAMOTO Ken’ichi
Map of Japan (Detail of the Chugoku Region) by Fernão Vaz Dourado

Why is it that utensils used in chanoyu are so expensive?
Ignoring for a moment the utensils we use during regular okeiko, the famous historical utensils and works of art such as calligraphy are bought and sold for prices that are far beyond extravagent.
And then, as today they are expensive, in the time of Rikyu Koji, already they were expensive.
No, upon researching it, prices were even more expensive than in modern times.
For example, when the wealthy merchant Shioya Souetsu bought the nitarinasu chaire, the price was said to be 100 kan.
Three generations of the Shioya family later, the official Ootomo Sourin asked to buy it for 5000 kan. Furthermore, Toyotomi Hideyoshi bought it along with the Arata Katatsuki Chaire for 10,000 kan.
5000 kan most likely is not the most expensive price recorded that a tea utensil has been sold for.
In that day, a common soldier’s income, differing depending on each family, was generally 1 sen 3 kan to 5 or 6 kan for one year.
In other words, one chaire cost the same as nearly 1000 years to 2000 years worth of a common soldier’s income.
1 kan could buy 2 koku worth of rice.
That might seem inexpensive caculating from the price of rice, but as a normal worker’s income, if it is from the true feeling of living, thinking that 1 kan is about 1 million yen would not be a big mistake.
So if 1 kan is 1 million yen, the 5 thousand kan nitarinasu would be about 5 billion yen.
At last, a price to moan at.
Compared to 5 thousand kan, that is an expensive chaire.
A chaire worth an entire country!
A retainer of Oda Nobunaga, Takigawa Kazumasu, during the attack of Takeda for approving the attack???, requested of Nobunaga the the famous chaire called Shukou Konasubi.
Nobunaga refused, unable to bear bestowing the chaire upon him.
Instead, he bestowed upon him the whole province of Kouzuke and 2 counties of Shinano. The Shukou Konasubi chaire was worth more than an entire provice, so it is said.

Why have the untensils of wabi-cha come to be so expensive even to that degree? Previously it wasn’t so mysterious.
However, expensive they might be, if there weren’t people able to buy at that price, they wouldn’t be selling at that price.
In the case of tea utensils, I feel it was an occasion for those buying at that price to boast of that rather expensive price.
Things being bought and sold so expensively, those circumstances must have had a very abundent economic system.
As for Hideyoshi actually paying the price of 10 thousand kan, he probably had enough assets to pay it without worry.
How can he have such a surplus of assets?
Only in a territory ruled harshly as a basis of wealth, it is impossible to understand.
But in the Japan of Oda Nobunaga and Toyotomi Hideyoshi, a bubble economy of silver was growing.
To gain an understanding of this, let us look to the scholars of Chinese history.
In the first half of the 16th century, at the time when Nobunaga was still but a boy, China was producing a ton of silver. After that, Iwami Silver Mine was developed. In the Tembun period (1532-1555), since the new technique for refining metals of cupellation was introduced, the amount of silver produced in Japan greatly increased.
On the other hand, as the mines dried up, the amount of silver produced in China decreased.
For that reason, it became that the silver produced and exported from Japan exceed that of China.
According to estimates, in 1580 just the last year of Rikyu Imai, roughly 6 thousand kan (18.75-22.5 tons) of silver were exported from Japan in a years time.
However irritating it may be to not know exactly how much during that period, a little after at the start of the 17th century, it is conjectured that Japan was producing one third of all the worlds silver.

利休の風景
戦国バブル
作家山本謙一(やまもと けんいち)
フェルナン・ヴァス・ドワラード作「日本図」(中国地方を拡大)

茶の湯の茶道具というのは、どうしてああも高価なのであろうか。
ふだんのお稽古に使う道具はさておくとして、由緒伝来のある名品は、書画などの美術品をはるかにしのぐとてつもない高値で売買されている。
もっとも、いまも高値だが、利休居士の当時にも、すでに高価であった。
いや、調べてみると、当時のほうが、いまの相場よりほど高かったのである。
たとえば、茶入の似茄子(にたりなす)は、最初に堺の豪商塩屋宗悦が買ったときは、銭百貫の値であったという。
塩屋に三代伝わったのち、豊後の大友宗麟が銭五千貫で買い求め、さらに豊臣秀吉が、新田肩衝とともに一万貫で買い取った。
銭五千貫というのは、おそらく、記録のある茶の湯の道具の価格として最高値ではなかろうか。
当時の足軽の収入は、家中によって違うが、だいたい一年につき銭三貫から五、六貫。
つまりは、茶入ひとつが、足軽の年収千年分から二千年分近くしたことになる。
銭1貫あれば、米が二石買えた。
米価から計算するとたいそう安くなってしまうが、労働者の年収として、生活実感からすれば、銭一貫はおよそ百万円ほどと考えて大きな問違いはなかろう。
銭一貫が百万円だとすると、五千貫の似茄子は五十億円ということになる。
つい、唸りたくなる値段である。
銭五千貫よりさらに高い茶入もあった。
一国に値する茶入―。
織田信長の家臣だった滝川一益は、武田攻めのときの武攻を認められたため、信長に名物茶入の珠光小茄子を所望した。
信長は断り、茶入の拝領はかなわなかった。
その代わりに上野(こうずけ)一国と信濃(しなの)二郡を与えられたため、珠光小茄子は、一国より値打ちがある茶入だと言われるようになった。

なぜ、侘茶の道具がそれほどまでの高値になったのか、かねて不思議でならなかった。
どんなに高値をつけたとしても、その値段で買う者があらわれなければ売買は成立しない。
茶道具の場合は、値をつけて買った者がむしろ高値を自慢している節が感じられる。
物が高く売買されるのは、その背景に豊かな経済社会があるはずが。
秀吉が銭一万貫の値をつけて実際に払ったのは、払っても困らないだけの資産があったからだろう。
そんな余裕が、どうやってできたのか?
豊業を基本とした領酷支配だけでは、どうにも納得しにくい。
―織田信長や豊臣秀吉時代の日本は、銀のバブル経済に沸いていた。
そのことを教えてくれたのは、中国史の研究者の方である。
十六世紀の前半、信長がまだ少年だったころ、銀は中国でたくさん産出していた。
そののち、石見銀山が開発され、天文年間(一五三二~一五五五)に、新しい精錬技術である灰吹法が導入されてから、日本の銀の産出量が大いに増えた。
一方、中国の銀は、堀り尽くされたために産出量が滅少した。
そのため、日本の銀の産出・輸出量が中国を上回るようになったというのである。
推定によれば、利休居士の晩年にあたる一五八〇年代に、日本から輸出された銀は年間ざっと五、六千貴(十八・七五~二二・五トン)。
どうにも同時代の正確なところがわからなくてもどかしいのだが、すこし後の十七世紀初頭には、日本は世界の銀の三分の一を産出していたと推計されている。

Advertisements